Home EV Charging Stations Comparison Table

    Plugin

    • Very easy to install by mounting the station to the wall and plugging into a NEMA rated outlet (for the stations we show you below, usually a 6-50/14-50 outlet, I.E. connected to a 50 Amp dedicated circuit, but check specific manufactures instructions on required plug)
    • Can unplug from the outlet take with you. Not a permanent fixture in nature and allows flexibility to be mobile when needed
    • Not rated for the outdoors
    • Costs a bit more to buy relative to hardwire station, (but your install can be less if you have an existing NEMA rated outlet)

    Product

    Rating On Amazon

    Availability on Prime

    Price

    Dimensions

    ( W x H x D Inches)

    Cord Management

    Connectivity

    Warrenty

    Weight

    (Lbs)

    Cord Lenght

    (Feet)

    Programable 

    Power Speifications

    UL Certification

    Miscellaneous Features

    41 Reviews

    13 x 12 x 8

    Cable Hanger

    No

    3 Years

    20

    25

    No

    30 AMP, 240 Volt

    UL Certified

    Preferred charging partner of Nissan, Ford, Fiat, Mitsubishi, Kia, and Volvo


    Buy



    171 Review(s)

    7 x 11.2 x 5

    Cord Rest on Top of Unit

    Yes

    3 Years

    ~8

    18

    Yes, Via Smartphone

    32 Amp, 240 Volt

    UL Certified

    Mobile App, Overair Software Updates, Connects to Nest 


    Buy



    94 Review(s)

    9 x 19.7 x 5.3

    Cord rests on top of unit, comes with connector holster

    No

    3 Years

    13.5

    25

    No

    32 Amp 240 Volt

    UL Certified

    Lockable Connector; Lock & Keys Included; Made in USA; Higher power at 40 Amps


    Buy



    182 Review(s)

    10 x 6 x 3

    Cord rests on top of unit, comes with connector holster

    Yes

    3 Years

    20

    24

    Yes, Via Smartphone

    40 Amp, 240 Volt

    No

    Higher power at 40 Amps; Voice control management via Alexa, charge scheduling/timing, energy metering, WiFi connectivity, notifications, smartphone app, etc.


    Buy



    68 Review(s)

    24 x 16.2 x 9 

    Cord rests on top of unit

    No

    1 Year

    34.6

    25 Feet

    No

    40 Amp, 240 Volt

    UL Certified



    Buy



    275 Review(s)

    20.5 x 18 x 15 

    Cord rests on top of unit

    No

    3 Years

    14.5

    20

    Charge delay button, 2,4,6,8 hours

    30 Amp, 240 Volt

    UL Certified

    Status indicating LED Halo


    Buy



     

    Hardwire

    • A permanent install, where you run the hardwire conduit right into the unit
    • Can be slightly less to buy than a plugin station but usually a costlier installation
    • Usually rated to be placed in an outdoor environment

    Product

    Rating On Amazon

    Availability on Prime

    Price

    Dimensions

    W x H D

    Inches

    Cord

    Management

    Connectivity

    Warrenty

    Weight

    (Lbs)

    Cord Lenght

    (Feet)

    Programable 

    Power Specfications

    UL Certification

    Miscellaneous Features

    23 Review(s)

    12x8x12 

    Cable Hanger

    No

    3 Years

    19

    15

    No

    30 Amp, 240 Volt

    UL Certified

    Preferred charging partner of Nissan, Ford, Fiat, Mitsubishi, Kia, and Volvo

    34 Review(s)

    13.8x15.7x5.0

    Cable Hanger

    No

    1 Year

    15.4

    18

    Yes

    Built-in timer delay buttons

    30 AMP, 240 Volt

    UL Certified

    $100 bonus credit to Blink Network Chargers 

    171 Review(s)

    7x11.2x5

    Cord Rest on Top of Unit

    Yes

    3 Years

    ~8

    18

    Yes,

    Via Smartphone

    32 Amp, 240 Volt

    UL Certified

    Mobile App, Overair Software Updates, Connects to Nest 

    96 Review(s)

    9x19.7x5.3

    Cord rests on top of unit, comes with connector holster

    No

    3 Years

    13.7

    25

    No

    32 Amp, 240 Volt

    UL Certified

    Lockable Connector; Lock & Keys Included; Made in USA; Higher power at 40 Amps

    5 Review(s)

    10x6x3.5 

    Cord rests on top of unit, comes with connector holster

    Yes

    3 Years

    21

    24

    Yes,

    Via Smartphone

    75 Amp, 240 Volt

    No

    High Power 75 Amp; Voice control management via Alexa, charge scheduling/timing, energy metering, WiFi connectivity, notifications, smartphone app, etc.

    3 Review(s)

    10.2x4x12.6 

    Cord rests on top of unit

    No

    2 Years

    23.2

    25

    No

    40 Amp, 240 Volt

    No

    Higher power at 40 Amps; Integrated on/off switch to minimize standby power

    106 Review(s)

    14.5x16x6.5

    Cord rests on top of unit

    No

    3 Years

    12.5

    14

    Yes,

    Charge delay button, 2,4,6,8 hours

    30 AMP, 240 Volt

    UL Certified

    Status indicating LED Halo

    58 Review(s)

    11.25x12x6.38

    Cord rests on top of unit

    No

    3 Years

    19.4

    No

    No

    30 Amp, 240 Volt

    UL Certified

    Ability to de-rate the unit's voltage and amperage based on the application;

    Green charging light illuminates to signal that vehicle is charging, switching to red in the event of a fault

    114 Review(s)

    12.7x9.5x4.4 

    Cable Hanger

    No

    18 Months

    18.6

    18

    No

    30 Amp, 208, 240 Volt

    UL Certified

    Free custom skin — over 600 designs or create your own, User-friendly, segmented LED display shows if the vehicle is charging and for how long it has charged

     

    With so many different chargers out there, the team here at EVSpace realized we need to make a basic product guide for the average consumer looking to buy a home EV charging station.

    While we have some posts on what is Level 2 Charging or a basic guide to home EV charging stations, (both of those linked at the end of this article), we thought a comparison table of specific features would be best.

    There are two tables above- one for Hardwire stations and one for Plugin stations.

    We tried to start off and curate this list with some of the more common, 30+ Amp, main stream brands that have some reputation in the industry and can easily be purchased through your Amazon accounts. This is not meant to be a review of any for any of the stations, but we let you know what customers are thinking on Amazon for these product.

    With the separate comparison tables above, one on plugin stations and one on hardwire stations, you will hopefully find this resource helpful, enjoy!

    See here for our article on Level 2 Charging and an intro guide to purchasing a residential station for your home.

    Residential Charging Stations (EVSEs): How to Choose the Right One

      While all modern electric vehicles come with a portable 120v EVSE (charger), eventually, most EV owners decide to install a level 2, 240v EVSE where they live, or in some cases, where they work. It’s common to hear people refer to EVSE at “charging stations” but the acronym EVSE (Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment) is really more appropriate. That’s because the actual charging equipment, the AC to DC inverters & necessary electronics, are always built into the cars. The EVSE doesn’t charge the battery; it simply supplies electricity to the car in a safe manner. The onboard electronics in the car converts the AC electric to DC electric, which then charges the battery.

      Level 2 EVSEs can recharge the average electric vehicle about four to five times faster than the 120v, level 1 EVSE which comes with the vehicle. This can increase the utility of your electric vehicle greatly. Upgrading to a level 2 EVSE may be less of a necessity for owners of plug in hybrid electric cars, since they have the additional gasoline power source. Still, many PHEV owners choose to install a level 2 EVSE, because the faster charging allows them to drive as much as possible on electricity alone.

      There are dozens of Level 2 EVSEs on the market; some costing as little as a couple hundred dollars, while others costing in the thousands. In order to decide which unit is best for your needs, you should consider the following:

      Cost: Just a few years ago there wasn’t a 240v home EVSE on the market for much less than $1,000. Luckily, things have changed, and in the past couple of years competition has driven down the cost dramatically. You can now buy a well made, quality home EVSE for under $400. The first decision you should make is how much are you willing to spend. Your budget will really help you narrow down the choices.

      Power: While all of these EVSEs will work on 208/240v (208v is three-phase power and generally used in commercial buildings. 240v is what is typically available in residential buildings in the US), the amperage they deliver can range from 16 amps all the way up to 80 amps. The average electric vehicle typically accepts up to 7.2 kW, which is 30 amps of power on 240v service. You arrive at the power rating by multiplying the amperage by the voltage, in this case 30(amps) X 240 (volts) = 7,200 watts, or 7.2kW.

      The typical PHEV today only accepts 3.3kW but many PHEV owners choose to install an EVSE that can deliver more than 3.3kW because they are planning for the future, when they own a BEV that can charge at a higher rate. We at EVSpace recommend getting an EVSE that can deliver at least 30 amps, preferably 40 amps, even if the car you drive today cannot accept that much power. There are low cost EVSEs that only deliver 16 amps, but you may regret not getting a higher powered one in the future. As long as you can afford it, it’s probably the right decision to buy a high-powered EVSE now, and future proof your garage.

      Options & Features:

      With the exception of Tesla vehicles, (because Tesla uses a proprietary connector) any EVSE you buy will charge any modern electric car. You don’t need to check if it’s compatible with your vehicle, because every electric car besides Tesla uses the J1772 connector and every EVSE for sale in the US has a J1772 connector attached. With that in mind there are differences from model to model. Here are some of the features you should consider:

      – Hard wired or portable? Some EVSEs offer the option of having a plug attached rather than being hard wired. This is a nice feature to have because you can take the unit with you if needed. Some people install a second 240v receptacle at work or at a family member’s house so when they visit they can bring their plug-in EVSE and charge while they’re there. Also, since it simply unplugs, it’s much easier to replace or upgrade if you need to. Another advantage to getting a plug-in EVSE, is that you can have an electrician install the 240v outlet ahead of time, so when you do get the unit you simply plug it in, and can use it the same day. The only downside is that plug-in EVSEs will cost slightly more than their hard-wired counterparts.

      – Cable Length. The cables can be as short as 16 feet and as long as 25 feet. Make sure you measure how much cable length you’ll need before you determine where you’re going to mount the EVSE, and take into consideration that the charge port location is different on every EV. Make sure the cable is long enough to reach any side of the car because your next EV will likely have a different charge port location. EVSpace recommends getting a cable that is at least twenty feet long.

      – Wifi Connectivity. Some of the latest EVSEs have wifi connectivity as an option. This is a great feature as it allows the user to track their energy usage, charging time and even see the real-time power draw of the vehicle. These EVSEs do cost more than a typical unit that doesn’t offer wifi-connected features, but it’s definitely a nice option to have, especially for the EV owner that craves data!

      Once you’ve decided which EVSE you want, and before you buy it, you should contact a licensed electrician and have them give you an estimate for either installing it (if it’s hard wired), or installing the 240V outlet with the appropriate NEMA 6-50 or NEMA 15-50 receptacle. The electrician will need to know the power the EVSE can deliver, not the power your car can accept. They will need to size the wiring according to the maximum the EVSE is capable of supplying any vehicle, not your particular car. It’s important to have an electrician come to your home and inspect your electrical service before you buy the EVSE, because some homes don’t have the available capacity to add an EVSE without doing a service upgrade which can cost thousands of dollars. You should know how much the installation is going to cost before buy the EVSE, as that may impact which model you choose.

      What is DC Fast Charging for an EV?

        DC Fast Charging:

        A concern you read a lot about when it comes electric cars is how to get faster charging when you need it. There are 3 speeds for charging, Level 1, Level 2, and DC Fast Charging. You could read up on the overviews we gave of Level 1 and Level 2. In this post we are going to be covering DC Fast Chargers (DCFC).

        What is DC Fast Charging (DCFC) for an EV?

        DC Fast Charging from a power standpoint is usually with an input of 208/480V AC three-phase. Currently, the amperage of most the stations in the ground can range anywhere from 150 -200 amps with the kWh output being anywhere from 50-120 kWh. (Note, this higher speed is not called “Level 3” technically as the term “Level 3” has not yet been defined or standardized by the organized body, SAE).

        Does DC Fast Charging (DCFC) work with every car?

        No, it does not. First, not every car is capable of DCFC. In addition, there are 3 different standards for the connector of DC Fast Charging; Tesla, CHAdeMO, and SAE Combo. Tesla Super Chargers have a max output of 120 kWh but note, if 2 drivers are using both charging ports on the same charger, they will each be getting 60 kWh (that’s why you usually see one car per charger, even though the charger has 2 connectors). Currently for sale, CHAdeMO stations have a max output of 60 kWh, and SAE Combo stations on the market right now have a max output of 50-60 kWh. So what are each of the 3 about?

        CHAdeMO DC Fast Charging
        On the cars that take CHAdeMO, you will actually have 2 ports, one for Level 2 charging:

        Chademo port

        Chademo connector

        (The left port in the first, top picture is the DC Fast Charging CHAdeMO port and the right port in the first picture above is the Level 2 port. The lower picture on the bottom is the CHAdeMO connector from the station that plugs into the port)

        SAE Combo DC Fast Charging

        With cars that can charge using SAE Combo, it is much simpler as the car only has one port in contrast to CHAdeMO capable electric vehicles. The same port that uses Level 2 charging has two openings right below it. The DCFC connector uses that entire port to connect (the Level 2 connector would just use the upper circle of that port). See the images below:

        SAE Combo Port

        SAE Combo Connector

        (The image on the top is what the SAE combo port looks like. The image on the bottom is the SAE Combo connector from the station that plugs into the port)

        Tesla DC Fast Charging

        Tesla’s Supercharger locations can only be used for Tesla cars. In addition, Tesla cars can take advantage of CHAdeMO fast chargers through a separate adapter that can be purchased directly from Tesla here.

        DCFC Stanard-location

        DCFC Stanard-ports

        Below, is a table of which cars have DC Fast Charging, and which standard they use:

        DCFC Auto Standard


        How long will it take to charge my car using a fast charger?

        This is a really common question- how long until my car goes from empty to fully charged? The answer is this really depends on the size of your battery. Think of it this way: with a gas tank in your gasoline powered car, if I would ask you, “How much gas do I need for a full tank in a gas car?” You would say, the bigger the tank, the more gallons, and in turn fuel, it could hold. Different cars have different size “fuel tanks”.
        With electric cars, think of the battery as your fuel tank. Different cars have different size batteries. The 2017 Chevy Bolt, which is a pure electric car, has a 60 kWh battery that can take you 238 miles. The Tesla Model S Sedan and Model X SUV, as of a new announcement a few months ago, now have an option to be bought with a whopping 100 kWh battery pack which give them a range of ~380 miles. You can check out the battery sizes and the range of all electric cars here.

        So how long will it take to charge a car on a DC Fast Charger?
        A Nissan Leaf, with a battery size option of 30 kWh and a full range of 107 miles, can get a full charge on a fast charger in less than 30 minutes according to Nissan.
        The fast charging time for 2017 Chevy Bolt with the 60 kWh battery, according to the Bolt review by Motor Trend’s Christian Seabaugh will: “…gain 90 miles worth of range in 30 minutes, 160 miles worth in 60 minutes, and a full 238 miles of range in about two hours.”

        The Tesla Model S or X with the larger 100 kWh battery pack which has a range of approximately 380 miles can give you 170 miles of range in 30 minutes.

        Get the point? Smaller battery, less time to fill up. Larger battery, more time to fill up.

        An interesting note from Tesla that applies to other cars as well when using a fast charger:

        “Charging from 10% to 80% is quick and typically provides ample range to travel between most Superchargers. Charging from 80% to 100% doubles the charge time because the car must reduce current to top off cells. Actual charge times may vary.”

        Want to know how much you drive a day? Take a look at our range calculator use the tool here under the “Daily Roundtrip” section.

        When should I use a DC Fast Charger for my EV?

        Fast Charging is meant for longer trips and typically not meant for urban, every day driving. You will usually find them on the highway, or some stores may have them as a convenience here and there.

        Check out our posts on Level 1 Charging and Level 2 Charging and our full listing of featured home (residential) and public charging stations.  There are also  a range of guides on internet, such as this one from Million Mile Secrets, which explain these details, benefits, and differences between the types of charging in hopes of allaying the wary of driving long distances in an EV.

        What is Level 2 Charging for an EV?

          Level 2 Charging:

          You are thinking of buying an electric car or have just purchased one. You are going to hear a lot about different “levels” of charging so we thought to give you an overview on how to approach this. What are different types Levels? How long does it to take to charge my car? Do they work with all cars? This is what we hope to tackle for you. This article is about Level 2 charging but click here to read our posts to Level 1 Charging and Fast Charging

          If you are new to the area of electric vehicles and are exploring how charging works, you may have heard about different “Levels” of charging. In our last post, we gave you some background into Level 1 charging, and in this one we’re going to dive into what Level 2 charging is all about.

          What is Level 2 Charging for an EV?

          From an electrical standpoint, Level 2 means a power source that is between 16 to 40 Amps, on 208, 220, or 240 Volts. This is the type of outlet that typically a home water heater or a dryer use. Most of the public charging stations that you see out there are Level 2 stations as well. We’ll get into that a bit more later. Level 2 stations can give out anywhere from a little over 3 kWh to 7.2 kWh.
          To give you an idea of what those outlets looks like, see the below in pink.
          Outlets
          Diagram created by Wikimedia Commons user Orion Lawlor.

          How long will it take to charge my car?

          This is a really common question- how long until my car goes from empty to fully charged? The answer is this really depends on the size of your battery. Think of it this way: with a gas tank in your gasoline powered car, if I would ask you, “How much gas do I need for a full tank on a gas car?” You would say, the bigger the tank, the more gallons, and in turn fuel, it could hold. Different cars have different size fuel tanks.
          With electric cars, think of the battery as your fuel tank. Different cars have different size batteries. The 2017 Chevy Volt, which is a plugin hybrid, has an 18.4 kWh size battery that on pure electric could take you about 53 miles before the gas kicks in. 2017 Chevy Bolt, which is a pure electric car, has a 60 kWh battery that can take you 238 miles. And, as of a new announcement a few months ago, the Tesla Model S Sedan and Model X SUV now have an option to be bought with a whopping 100 kWh battery pack which give them a range of ~380 miles. You can check out the battery sizes and the range of all electric cars here.

          So how long will it take to charge a car on Level 2? Typically, most public Level 2 stations are set to give out 7.2 kWh and your battery, if like the 2017 Chevy Bolt, will take a little over 8 hours to fully charge from empty on a Level 2. Remember, most often, you are not going to be charging a completely empty battery. Charging your car is more like charging a phone, you top it off when you get home. If you’re driving about 40 miles a day, which is what an average American driver typical does daily, to get that range back on a Level 2 Charger would take about 1.5- 2 hours. Want to know how much you drive a day? Take a look at our range calculator tool here under the “Daily Roundtrip” section.

          Do all cars charge at the same speed when using the same Level 2 Charger?

          No. Some cars can accept more electricity at a faster rate than the others. Each electric car has an on-board charger. This dictates how much electricity it can pull. So for example, the on-board chargers of the Chevy Bolt, Nissan Leaf, and BMW i3 can pull 7.2 kWh from a Level 2, which is great because that is the max output of your typical Level 2, 40 amp station. But some cars (typically a plugin hybrid electric vehicle know as PHEV) like the Chevy Volt, Ford Fusion Energi, Audi A3 Etron, pull around 3.5 kWh. The Hyundai Sonata Plug-in Hybrid could pull around 5.5 kWh. The Volkswagen E-Golf and the Ford Focus Electric, which are both full batter electric vehicles (BEVs), pull around 6.6 kWh. So that means for these cars, even if the Level 2 stations can give out 7.2 kWh, the cars on-board charger may not be able to take that whole amount. This is why, technically, what we refer to as the “Charging Station” is really called an EVSE, Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment. The actual is charger is technically on the car.

          This info about the on-board charger rate could be important and we have made it easy for you to see that info. Take a look at our listing of cars here and click on the “Details” button to get that info.

          Can my electric car work with every Level 2 Charger out there?

          Yes, all cars can use a Level 2 charger. The industry has adopted standardization around the type of connector it uses for Level 2. It’s called a J1772 and looks like this:

          J1772

          For Tesla drivers, the car comes with a J1772 adapter to plug in to the other side of your Universal Mobile Connector. Check out a video Tesla put out here for how that works.
          Fast Charging, which is another higher type of charging above Level 2, has not standardized a connector.

          When should I use a Level 2 Charger?

          Typically, at the office, your home, parking garages, and hotels, are the most common applications for a Level 2 station but you could see them at retail locations and rest stops. We will have a dedicated series on how to choose the right type of station for each of these type of properties so stay tuned!

          Are there different types of Level 2 stations?

          Yes, there are. Like we said, a Level 2 station can be anywhere from 16-40 amps. Also, most Level 2 stations can be put into 2 different groups: Networked and Non-Networked. Check out our page here for the list of stations, and click on the “Details” button to see if the station is networked.
          Typically, at a single family residential home, non-networked Level 2 charging is the way to go as they are less expensive and do the trick. Regarding multifamily, you may want to look at networked station (see our guide for multifamily charging here). When the station is out in the public, you may want a networked piece of equipment to charge people for using the station, restrict access to only work with your customers, residents or tenants, or to keep track of the usage and monitor the station.

          We will have others posts that discusses how to approach public charging, whether to charge drivers for charging, and whether to purchase a networked or non-networked station,

          Should I get a Level 2 station at home?

          This is a solid question so we have dedicated a whole series of articles by our Director of Content Tom Moloughney on how to approach home charging and whether Level 2 is better than Level 1. Take a look at that article here
          Click here to read our posts to Level 1 Charging and Fast Charging and check out the different public and residential Level 2 stations on the market here
          Comments or questions? See something you like or would have liked to know more about? Email us at contact@evspace.com

          What is Level 1 Charging for an EV?

            Level 1 Charging:

            You are thinking of buying an electric car or have just purchased one. You are going to hear a lot about different “Levels” of charging so we thought to give you an overview on how to approach this. What are different types of Levels? How long does it to take to charge my car? Do they work with all cars? This is what we hope to tackle for you. This article is going to answer “What is Level 1 Charging for an EV?”
            See our other posts on what are Level 2 Charging and Fast Charging

            What is Level 1 Charging for an EV?

            From an electrical standpoint, Level 1 just means plugging into your typical outlet that you may find in your home or even out on the road (get permission before plugging into a public outlet! Otherwise, stealing that power may get you arrested like this guy!) Your typical standard outlet is usually 16 AMPs at 110 or 120 volts. That’s typical putting out ~0.96kWh.

            How long will it take to charge my car?

            This is a really common question- how long until my car goes from empty to fully charged? The answer is this really depends on the size of your battery. Think of it this way: With a gas tank in your gasoline powered car, if I would ask you, “How much gas do I need for a full tank on a gas car?” you would say, the bigger the tank, the more gallons, and in turn fuel, it could hold. In other words, different cars have different size fuel tanks.
            With electric cars, think of the battery as your fuel tank. Different cars have different size batteries. The 2017 Chevy Volt, which is a plugin hybrid, has an 18.4 kWh size battery that on pure electric could take you about 53 miles before the gas kicks in. The 2017 Chevy Bolt, which is a pure electric car, has a 60 kWh battery that can take you 238 miles. And, as of a new announcement a few months ago, the Tesla Model S Sedan and Model X SUV now have an option to be bought with a whopping 100 kWh battery pack which give them a range of ~380 miles. You can check out the battery sizes and the range of all electric cars here.

            So how long will it take to charge a car on Level 1? If you’re getting ~0.96kW from a wall outlet an hour, and your battery is like the 2017 Chevy Bolt, the Bolt will take about 57 hours to fully charge from empty on a Level 1. That sounds pretty bad, right? It’s really not. Remember, most often, you are not going to be charging a completely empty battery. Charging your car is more like charging a phone, you top it off when you get home. If you’re driving about 40 miles a day, which is what your American driver typically does, to get that range back on a Level 1 Charger would take about 10-11 hours So pretty much, when driving 40-50 miles a day, an overnight charge could top off your car and you would be leaving your house every morning with a full tank (one of the best parts of having an electric car!).
            Want to know how much you drive a day? Take a look at our range calculator use the tool here under the “Daily Roundtrip” section.

            In addition, some cars can accept more electricity at a faster rate than the others. We’ll get to this a bit more in our next post on Level 2 Charging.

            How do I actually plug my car to a regular outlet?

            Every car you buy will come with a portable charger. It looks something like this:

            Level 1 Charger

            You can simply plug that into the outlet. If you want to look into a backup one, check out some of the ones we have here

            For Tesla drivers, there is a cord that comes with your car, a Universal Mobile Connector (UMC). You would need to plug into the other side of your UMC an adapter that will go in your regular wall outlet. Check out a video Tesla put out here for how that works.

            If you’re planning on plugging into a regular wall outlet in a garage that you really haven’t used before, our Director of Content at EVSpace, Tom Moloughney, has some good advice:

            “Have an electrician inspect the outlet and circuit you’ll be plugging the 120v EVSE into. Often, especially on older homes, outlets in the garage don’t get much use and can be exposed to humidity, dust and other contaminants. The connections may be loose from years of use, and aren’t ready to be used for many hours every day now under a high load. In most cases the electrician will just inspect it and tighten the connections. It’s only a couple dollars for a new receptacle so you might as well ask them to replace it while they are there. That way you know it’s new and ready for the task of daily charging”

            When should I use a Level 1 Charger?

            Most often, Level 1 Charging is done at home with a regular outlet. Sometimes, in a parking garage or at your work place, there may be an outdoor outlet that you can use, but make sure to ask before using it. Building owners and management don’t like the surprise of finding out that someone has been taking electricity from them.

            Should I only rely on a Level 1 at home?

            This is a solid question so we have dedicated a whole series of articles by our Director of Content Tom Moloughney on how to approach home charging and whether Level 1 suffices. Take a look at that article here.

            See our other posts on Level 2 Charging and Fast Charging

            Comments or questions? See something you like or would have liked to know more about? Email us at contact@evspace.com

            How Much Does It Cost To Charge An Electric Vehicle?

              There are many reasons for making an electric vehicle (EV) the next car you buy or lease. Besides the environmental benefits, the promise of energy security, the silky-smooth driving experience with instant torque available without delay, and minimal maintenance requirements, one of the best characteristics of EVs is how little they cost to operate.

              Just as with gasoline cars, some EVs are more efficient than others, but the average EV needs about 30 kWh of electricity for 100 miles of range. For example, the EPA rating for the Nissan LEAF is exactly 30 kWh of electricity needed per 100 miles driven. A Tesla Model S 70D is rated at a combined 33 kWh per 100 miles and uses a little more energy since it is heavier and more powerful than a LEAF. The BMW i3 BEV is currently the most fuel efficient car (electric or otherwise) available in the United States, and has a combined consumption rating of 27 kWh per 100 miles. The consumption for all EVs can be viewed at the US Department of Energy’s website: www.fueleconomy.gov

              According to researchers at the University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute, the sales-weighted average fuel economy of all new vehicles sold in the United States in 2016 was 25.2 mpg. The average cost for a gallon of regular gasoline in the U.S. over the past five years was $3.32/gallon. By using 15,000 miles as the average amount of miles a person will drive in a year, the annual cost of gasoline for the average car will be $1,976.20 per year, using the average cost of gasoline from 2011 through 2015.

              Electricity rates vary much more than gasoline across the country, but the cost over time is much more stable. There aren’t huge spikes in electricity rates if a refinery has a problem like there is with gasoline, and neither does the price skyrocket when there is political instability in one of the larger oil producing countries as we have historically seen, since all of the electricity we use in America is domestically produced. The average cost of electricity in the U.S. is 12 cents per kWh. As mentioned, the average EV needs about 30 kWh of electricity to drive 100 miles. Therefore, the average person driving the average EV 15,000 miles per year will pay about $540.00 annually to charge their car. As mentioned, the cost of electricity can vary greatly depending on where you live, but in order to equal the price of the average gasoline car’s fuel costs, the price of electricity would have to be nearly four times the national average and cost 44 cents per kWh.

              Another great thing about electric cars is that you can easily reduce your electric bill by $40 to $50 per month just by being more efficient and therefore completely eliminate your transportation fuel cost! You can’t use less gasoline unless you drive less or buy a more efficient car, but you can reduce your electricity usage at home and still drive as much as you always have. Simple measures like programmable thermostats and the use of efficient LED light bulbs can make a big difference. In fact, five 100 watt incandescent light bulbs left on continuously for a year use nearly the same amount of energy as it takes to power an electric car 15,000 miles! Here’s how: five 100 watt light bulbs use 500 watts per hour. In 24 hours, they use 12,000 watts or 12 kWh. In 365 days, they use 4,380 kWh. A typical EV that uses 30 kWh for every 100 miles  requires 4,500 kWh of electricity to drive 15,000 miles a year. Simply by turning off unnecessary lighting at your home you can drastically reduce – or eliminate – your annual transportation fuel cost entirely!

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